About

Laura received her B.S. in Computer Science from New York University and is a self-taught designer. Laura's happy place is the beach and her couch in that order. If she could bring her couch and TV with her to the beach, she would.


Design philosophies

The in between moments

Laura believes in designing for what happens in between, when people are not using a product. A person's actions before and after using a product - the moments in between - are all part of that person's experience. The product doesn't live in its own vacuum of existence, so we shouldn't design for it with that assumption.

If a product is meant to be immersive, like a movie theater, then the in between is the preparation that a person does—like commuting, or buying popcorn, or putting their phone on silent—to settle into something long-term that takes all of their focus, like watching the movie.

If a product is meant to be a companion, then the in between is a lot of busy distraction where entering into and exiting out of the the product need to be flawless, fast experiences that push relevant utility into the foreground without interrupting or overwhelming mental flow.


Subtle ambience over showing off

Laura believes that digital products are the most charming and delightful when they're not trying too hard to pass as human, and instead embrace their more... computery roots.

The voice of a digital product isn't just spoken with text, or illustrations, or sleek animations—it's a combination of nuanced touches of magic through word choices and visual cues that give off a "there's life here" ambience.

One way that Laura practices this design philosophy is by incorporating natural animations and subtle particle systems into her work. Pictured on this page are Stars and Constellations built with CSS & JS, and Smoke, Ambient Light, and Glitter built with Swift.


Don't mess with the mental model

When designing something complex, like introducing new tools or creating entirely new concepts, Laura believes in grounding that complex new thing inside of a world that is familiar and tangible, where the familiar serves as a common denominator between that complex new thing and what a person has already learned.

Don’t break peoples' brains by messing with their mental model of how your common denominator is supposed to behave—don't choose a platform, a language, a component, an interaction, or an aesthetic that doesn't match the goal of the problem that you're trying to solve.


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